• Toads and Great Crested Newts form an important part of the local biodiversity and ecological make up within Ringwood.
  • Ringwood is fortunate to still have a toad and Great Crested Newt population as in many areas these species have diminished and in some places are gone for good.
  • Loss of habitat, predatory factors, land development and environmental factors play a role in the declining numbers. Yet, accidental roadkill contributes a major reason for their demise
  • The Great Crested Newt is a protected species due to it being considered an endangered amphibian
  • Both the toads and the newts attempt to reach the Blashford Lakes to mate and spawn.
  • Local residents will know of the 1 mile stretch of Gorley Road, close to the Blashford Lakes in Poulner, Ringwood. This is where many of the toads and newts will attempt to cross.
  • Toads and newts can emerge from hibernation any time from January onwards, depending on local weather conditions, and road crossings can then last through until May.
  • They are more likely to make the road and lane crossings at dusk and during the evening when it is damp, wet and/or when the temperature is above 6°C.
  • Wind chill factor also determines when they will attempt to cross and therefore the wind chill factor must be 5 or above otherwise the climate is too cold for them to cross .
  • The toad patrol volunteers from Ringwood Amphibian Conservation patrol the  Gorley Road to assist these amphibians to safely reach their spawning grounds and back.
  • In 2017, a total of 866 toads were saved, but in previous years it was common to secure the safe passage of over 1000. Numbers are continuing to drop.
  • The toad patrol volunteers have found many Great Crested Newts both adults and babies attempting to make the journey and sadly we have found both dead and injured adult and baby Great Crested Newts, besides the toads.
  • These amphibians are not easy to see after dark so we rely on the volunteers to support their numbers. We also rely on the local residents and visiting public to take extra care, be vigilant and to slow their speed so that less are killed from passing cars.
  • The Ringwood Amphibian Conservation group ask that people and residents locally help us to maintain the numbers of these amphibians as we can all play an important part in their survival.
  • We are also seeking more volunteers. It is extremely rewarding and a great way of meeting others enjoying the local wildlife and keeping fit and mobile. The group also enjoy social time together so many new friendships have been developed from within our volunteer work.
  • Please contact Tracie on 07747534153 or 01202 884592 or 01425478891 if you would like to become involved. All offers of support are welcome.